Most Popular Flowers in Britain

most-popular-flowers-in-britain

All wild flowers are a thing of great natural beauty.

That is not to say that all flowers are popular. Some flowers are popular because of their unique fragrance, beauty or sometimes both. Others simply don’t have as much appeal to consumers.

There are millions of different types, colours and families of flowers each with a unique nature and personality that makes them special. What is popular in one country may not be so popular in another country or region.

In Britain, certain flowers may gain favour with consumers and horticulturists in one region more than another. However, there are some flowers that we can all agree upon as a nation.

Here are some of the most popular flowers in Britain today.

Rose

The Rose is considered to be not only the most popular flower in Britain, but indeed throughout the world. Mostly associated with red and white, they in fact come in just about every colour under the sun except blue and true black. They are available all year round and come in a number of varieties. The red rose is, of course, the national emblem of having featured strongly throughout history.

Lily

Originating from the Chinese Middle Ages, Lilies have been cultivated for more than 3,000 years. The plant flowers until late autumn and there are three types; red, yellow and purple. It is available all year round and has found a place in the hearts of people throughout the United Kingdom. Historically Lilies were used to prepare remedies in popular medicine.

Freesia

Freesias are among the most popular and widely grown cut flowers in the world. Here in the UK over 110 million stems are sold each year. Although they are available all year round, their peak time is spring. They come in a wide range of colours including yellow, red, pink and black. Unlike most other flowers, where the white forms smell strongest, if you want highly scented freesia; look for pink and red varieties.

Tulip

The tulip is both well known and hugely popular in Britain and comes in every colour imaginable, except blue and true black. They originated in the Middle East and are available November to May with British Tulips available from January to April. Mostly associated with Holland they have played a significant role in popular culture with the artist David Hockney finding inspiration for many of his paintings.

Author: Lily Calyx

Flower expert, gardening enthusiast and creative mind behind our blog.

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